Rachel Morris

Rachel Morris

Memoir | History

A director of the museum-making company Metaphor, Rachel Morris has been part of the creation, design and delivery of some of the most exciting displays, renovations and museums of the last few decades, from the new Cast Courts at the V&A and the Ashmolean, Oxford to the Terracotta Warriors at the British Museum and Grand Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Rachel is also the author of two novels. @MoMarcoPolo

THE MUSEUM MAKERS: A JOURNEY BACKWARDS – FROM OLD BOXES OF DARK FAMILY SECRETS TO A GOLDEN ERA OF MUSEUMS

THE MUSEUM MAKERS: A JOURNEY BACKWARDS – FROM OLD BOXES OF DARK FAMILY SECRETS TO A GOLDEN ERA OF MUSEUMS

Beautiful storytelling

“I loved this book and can’t recommend it enough. Rachel Morris skilfully weaves her own story into her account of museum making and, in doing so, eloquently makes the case for why museums matter. Vivid, powerful and poignant, this beautifully written book shows how we can all be museum makers.”

D. S. Mattinson

Five star read

“Fascinating. Explores the relationship between objects, memory and stories. Woven through with the stories of the authors family and life. Beautifully written captivating read.”

E. L. Maher
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When you can’t go to a museum, let the museum come to you!”

Julie

“This is a well written and interesting volume. It seems somewhat in the current Zeitgeist to find a suitcase of memorabilia under your bed. Rachel Morris’s is more intriguing than most. Its contents are explained with reference to a genealogical diagram. She comes from a family of eccentrics, bohemians and adventurers. The male members are particularly dodgy and the women heroically inspiring.
Morris explains the value of tangible objects of all kinds in stirring her imagination. She has become an active trustee of several prominent museums and archives. The reader is given detailed and jolly histories of these. They are also well referenced.
The photographs include her sensitive and deeply loved grandmother. The illustrated chapter headings tell of her father, the unfortunate Guido Morris who founded The Latin Press in post-war St Ives.
Altogether a splendid satisfying read.”

Reader